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I posted a question about replicating the view-port lighting in the render - Is there a way to render an animation that looks like as if it is rendered with the OpenGL lights (View-port lights)?

However, the question is asked in a way that the answerer would have to answer as if he is answering multiple questions, which means in a way that I asked multiple questions with one post. Some of those questions can be -

  • "How to make objects not to block the lighting (like in the Blender Internal textured view)?"

  • "When objects are parented to the camera, how to make them not to react on the zooming of the camera?"

For example, one can post a question on - "How to use Blender to create a movie?". However, that involves knowledge about - Modeling, Lighting, Animating, Rendering etc.; that should be asked as separate questions.

What would be appropriate to do with those kind of questions and what do I have to do with the question? I thought of deleting it, but maybe there is another solution. And there is no delete button for the post. What do I do with it?

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  • $\begingroup$ It looks like you already fixed it yourself :) $\endgroup$ – gandalf3 Sep 1 '14 at 23:00
  • $\begingroup$ Not sure what you mean, but the post at first had other questions in it. I edited it and deleted them, but that doesn't change the fact that the post is a mixture of other questions. Any ideas what to do with it? $\endgroup$ – Vladimir Sep 2 '14 at 5:02
  • $\begingroup$ Since you removed them from the post, I assumed that you no longer were asking those questions. If you still want to ask those, feel free to create new questions with links to the original question for context if necessary. Though I think the "not block light" question as already been asked and answered here: blender.stackexchange.com/q/8108/599 $\endgroup$ – gandalf3 Sep 2 '14 at 5:48
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the post. The thing is that, the question I asked about blender is like I'm asking multiple questions in one post, so that an answerer would have to answer as if he is answering multiple questions. I'll make an edit to make this post more clearer. $\endgroup$ – Vladimir Sep 2 '14 at 6:10
  • $\begingroup$ Just split your questions into multiple posts so that each post has one question each. That said, I think your question is fine as it is currently.. $\endgroup$ – gandalf3 Sep 2 '14 at 6:17
  • $\begingroup$ Ok. I don't want to make any violation as a user on the site, but if its fine I'll leave it as it is. I'll just put in the needed "tags". $\endgroup$ – Vladimir Sep 2 '14 at 6:24
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Questions can have multiple smaller follow-up questions if and only if they are directly related to the main question.

For example: "How do I change the focal length for camera to emulate that of a GoPro?" and in the body there is, "Also, where are the camera presets located? This is perfectly fine. However, asking how to extrude faces and add effect strips to a video are not.

So, as a general answer to your question and not the specific case you mentioned. There are several approaches you could take for questions that ask different questions in their body.

  1. If there is a larger or more prominent question, mention this to the poster and or edit it to be that specific one and answer that question. If all questions are of equal significance, cast a close vote as too broad.

  2. Mention in the comments section to the poster that multiple different questions aren't supposed to be in one post and cast a close vote as too broad.

Either way, always try to alert the original poster and do not attempt to answer several different questions in one post.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks for the answer. The post (about Blender) doesn't have other questions written into it, however the question is written in a way like I have asked different questions in one post. For example, one can ask how to use Blender, however, that would involve: Lighting, Modeling, Texturing etc. which should be asked separately. $\endgroup$ – Vladimir Sep 6 '14 at 1:58

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