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I recently suggested an edit to this question, but while I was doing the edit, someone with enough rep to do immediate edits (Shady Puck) finished his edit. While our edits were similar, his was more extensive and definitely better. I looked for a way to retract my suggestion, but I couldn't find any. Is it possible, and if so, how? And if not, why?

I'm not looking to withdraw my suggested edit in this specific case, as it has already been rejected. I wanted to know if I could have withdrawn it before anyone had acted on it, and, by extension, do so if similar situations should arise in the future. I realised that the edit was unecessary.

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No, there is no way for you to cancel your own edit.

You can see your suggested edits.
Then going to the review page for the edit in question, you can see it was rejected.


I'm a little confused about how you edited it what you did.

Shady Puck made his edit at 23:30:19 and you suggested your edit at 23:30:48, surely you could not of made all those changes in 29 seconds.

Now normally when you are editing a post, and another user comes along and updates it, you will get a notice at the top of the screen. SE will not let you submit your edit, because you are now working on an "old" version. (It really stinks when you have a big edit, and can't submit it.)

What I do in situations like that is copy all the text, and title if it is a question, reload the page, see what somebody else did, then make my necessary changes again.

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    $\begingroup$ No, I didn't do it 29 seconds. My edits were to the OP's original post, not to Shady Puck's edit. He and I probably started editing around the same time, and he finished before me. And I would have expected it to be automatically rejected by the system, just as you say. Seems to be a glitch somewhere. With only 29 seconds difference, it is quite possible that Shady and I clicked Save Edits almost at the same time. With today's high speed connections, that shouldn't be the case, but nothing is flawless. And I do know how and where to find my edit suggestions. $\endgroup$ – Duane Dibbley Sep 11 '16 at 14:44

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